Naproxen dosing for ringbone?

Last post 07-02-2010 6:24 AM by txspots. 7 replies.
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  • 06-21-2010 9:01 PM

    Naproxen dosing for ringbone?

    I am sorry if this has already been discussed, I tried searching for the answers, both on here and bing.com, and cant find a reliable answer.

    I have an older (18ish)  mare that has recently been diagnosed as having lower ringbone. We were told she was navicular when she was given to us, but I recently had my vet actually seriously look at her leg since it seems to be getting worse. He said that it was actually ringbone, not navicular syndrom. Both he and one of the ladies at the feed store (who has helped me out a ton with lots of animal issues) both told me that I could give her naproxen (aleeve) to help with the pain. I was just wondering what kind of dosage I could give or if anyone has any experience? When I asked Trevor (the vet) about it, I told him I had been giving it to her (about 4-5 220mg pills once per day) asking basically how much/how often I could give her without hurting her and he said probably quite a few. That isnt really the answer I was looking for.

    On another note, I keep her barefoot, and the trimmer takes her toe on that side super short and squared up a little to make it easier for her to break over.

    Any other ideas or suggestions? I am very wary of giving her bute, since I have heard it is easier for the horse to hurt themselves worse since they really cant feel it if they over do it until it is too late.

    Thanks  

    "My treasures do not clink together or glitter; They gleam in the sun and neigh in the night."
    -Arabian Proverb

    http://farbeyondexpectations.blogspot.com/
  • 06-22-2010 7:26 AM In reply to

    Re: Naproxen dosing for ringbone?

    "The usual daily naproxen dosage is a total of 10 milligrams per 2.2 pounds of body weight, divided into 2 doses. Dosage should not exceed 15 milligrams per 2.2 pounds per day"

    - source: http://www.raysahelian.com/naproxen.html

    Good luck with your ringbone treatment. ~FH

  • 06-22-2010 8:45 AM In reply to

    Re: Naproxen dosing for ringbone?

    A vet suggested you give Aleve instead of Bute and then couldn't tell you how much of it to give? Huh?

    Shawn :
    Any other ideas or suggestions? I am very wary of giving her bute, since I have heard it is easier for the horse to hurt themselves worse since they really cant feel it if they over do it until it is too late.

    Bute is an NSAID (non-steroidal, anti-inflammatory) for horses, just like Naproxen is for humans.  Anytime you work a horse (or a human, for that matter) that you know has issues such as arthritis you risk overdoing it, but Bute would not necessarily make that any worse so I don't understand why you would rather give Aleve than Bute, not to mention the fact that it would be a whole lot more expensive.

    And both have side effects such as stomach upset/ulcers that should be considered before use.

  • 06-26-2010 2:53 PM In reply to

    Re: Naproxen dosing for ringbone?

    No, he didnt suggest I give her Aleve instead of bute, he actually suggested doing a daily dosage of bute, I am just very leary of it. I have heard horror stories of horses hurting themselves on it and I just worry about that.

     

    "My treasures do not clink together or glitter; They gleam in the sun and neigh in the night."
    -Arabian Proverb

    http://farbeyondexpectations.blogspot.com/
  • 06-28-2010 8:37 AM In reply to

    Re: Naproxen dosing for ringbone?

    So if I'm understanding you correctly, you're worried that the horse will overdo it because the bute will numb or mask the pain?  If you follow the dosage recommended by your vet, your horse should be fine.  The thing to worry about with bute is not so much the horse overdoing it, but the effect it could have on the rest of his body if he has to be on it long term.  Course most vets are very aware of this and would dose it correctly.  Here's some good info I found that explains it pretty good:  (better than I do I know Smile)

    Horses treated with bute, especially at high doses or for long periods of time, can develop ulcers in their stomachs or colon, kidney damage and, in some cases, bone marrow suppression, although bone marrow problems are less common. More recent research has found that bute can slow the production of joint cartilage and delay bone healing. Bute also interferes with thyroid function.

    This doesn't mean that you should never use phenylbutazone. It does mean it should be used properly and only when necessary. Anti-inflammatory drugs are meant to be used for a relatively short period of time (days) for acute/new problems or flareups of active problems, for example, when a horse pulls a tendon, has acute laminitis or is worked too hard and an old joint problem becomes obviously worse. Three to seven days is the usual treatment course.

  • 06-28-2010 3:28 PM In reply to

    Re: Naproxen dosing for ringbone?

    Shawn :
    No, he didnt suggest I give her Aleve instead of bute, he actually suggested doing a daily dosage of bute, I am just very leary of it.

    What you're doing is called "extra-label dosing". That means using a product in a manner it was not intended or approved for. While it may not be expressly disapproved to use some products, such as Aleve, that way, I would think twice about substituting your own judgment to pursue what could only be called a homeopathic remedy instead of following your veterinarian's advice and counsel. But the bottom line is... it's your horse. ~FH
  • 07-01-2010 3:15 PM In reply to

    Re: Naproxen dosing for ringbone?

    txspots:
    So if I'm understanding you correctly, you're worried that the horse will overdo it because the bute will numb or mask the pain?

    Sorry it took so long to respond, I have been soooo busy with work

    That is exactly my worry. I ended up actually talking to the vet seriously about it, asking all sorts of "really stupid" questions, and figured out a dosing schedule and how/when to use the Bute paste and feel a lot more comfortable using it. I am still a little worried about the side effects, but in talking to Trevor about it, I realise that the effects of Naproxen could be more harmful in the long run.

    The mare will only get Bute once or twice a week, and only when ridden, and she only gets ridden by the kids for a mile or so at a time, usually on packed dirt canal banks.

    I am really hoping this works out

    "My treasures do not clink together or glitter; They gleam in the sun and neigh in the night."
    -Arabian Proverb

    http://farbeyondexpectations.blogspot.com/
  • 07-02-2010 6:24 AM In reply to

    Re: Naproxen dosing for ringbone?

    Shawn :
    That is exactly my worry.

    Bute is not going to numb your horse to the pain so that her leg breaks off and she doesn't know it.  When you get a headache and you take an aspirin, would you go beat your head against a brick wall and not be able to feel it?

    I'm glad you discussed it seriously with your vet, I hope he was able to explain bute to you, and there are no stupid questions!  You just need to learn to take things "you've heard" with a grain of salt, especially until you can discuss them with your vet.  And if you still have questions and don't feel comfortable with his information, get a second opinion.

     I think your mare is going to be just fine.  bute is totally safe and very effective when used in conjunction with and in accordance with your vet's supervision.  Just keep an eye on her (which I know you will) and if you notice any adverse reaction or that you think she's just not feeling well, call your vet.


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