My Gelding's Color?

Last post 03-28-2011 7:01 AM by Reining_Lover. 13 replies.
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  • 03-24-2011 8:03 AM

    My Gelding's Color?

    Anyone want to take a guess at what color my gelding will end up?  I'll try to provide as much info as possible....

    He was born a sorrel, out of a gray mare and by a sorrel stallion.  The gray mare is out of a gray mare and a gray stallion, and the sorrel stallion is out of a red roan mare and by a sorrel stallion.  I thought that info might help as clues to the sire's and dam's genetics.  He turned dark bay by the time he was a weanling, and that summer we had trouble with malnutrition and worms from the previous owner so he didn't completely shed out.  The next summer he shed out as a black/gray first but gradually got lighter and lighter until he was a gorgeous dun.  Then as winter came on he turned to light bay, and now he's back to dark bay but is getting lighter.  I keep joking with my friends that the next color he's going to turn is purple, LOL

    He has some gray guard hairs scattered throughout his winter coat, but as he continues to shed out those are gradually diminishing.  He has always had a dorsal stripe, though this past winter his coat got so thick you couldn't see it; but now that he's shedding it's appearing again.  I believe the only colors with a dorsal stripe are dun, buckskin, and grulla, right?  Or can gray have a dorsal stripe?

    Anyway I included some pics and thought somebody might be able to make a good guess at his color, as I'm pretty impatient and want to know what it will be NOW......LOL

    Photobucket

    At two, before shedding

    Photobucket

    At two, after shedding (legs are clipped because the MO mud was driving me nuts!)

    Photobucket

    At two, late summer, when he decided he didn't like the dark bay/black/gray he was before and changed to dun :D

    Photobucket

    At nearly three, when he so cleverly got himself stuck in the round bale feeder.  This is the most recent pic I have of him.  He has since lightened up a lot in his midsection.

    It's so funny as I look through these pictures....it looks like four completely different horses!!  But trust me, it's the same one.

    Have fun guessing!!  If any additional information would help you out, let me know ;)

    "99.9% of horse problems come from either a lack of respect or fear--or both." ~Clinton Anderson
  • 03-24-2011 8:11 AM In reply to

    Re: My Gelding's Color?

     He will grey out.  Grey most of the time cancels out other colour genes so he'll just get lighter and lighter as he ages.



    Solaris -- 16 hh Appendix Quarter Horse = MY DREAM COME TRUE!
    We Are Flying Solo
  • 03-24-2011 8:23 AM In reply to

    Re: My Gelding's Color?

    So can greys have dorsal stripes then?

    "99.9% of horse problems come from either a lack of respect or fear--or both." ~Clinton Anderson
  • 03-24-2011 8:46 AM In reply to

    Re: My Gelding's Color?

    I don't know about stripes, but I'd agree with Solaris, he'll grey out. It sounds like his dam is homozygous grey, and the only way you'd get anything else but a grey from her would be if she was HETEROZYGOUS grey. Both Athene and Juno were born dark bay, and Juno is almost white at 15 and Athene is dappled charcoal grey at 5. Grey is a wonderful color: they look stunning in all of the strong colors like purple, red, hunter green, blues, black, even chocolate brown. If you're familiar with the color seasons, greys are winters. I am a winter, too, so my show gear looks good on them, as well. And what's more important than that? :)

    Remember, though, with a grey you need to keep track of melanomas. Under the dock is a typical place for them. Both my grey girls get cimetidine to maintain they melanoma-free status--Athene--or keep the melanomas from growing, on Juno. 

    ETA--My donkeys both have dorsal stripes. One is grulla, but the other is liver chestnut. Does your gelding have donkey in him? :)
    Megan


    "The horse you get off is not the horse you got on. It is your job as a rider to ensure that as often as possible, the change is for the better."

    Anonymous




  • 03-24-2011 11:17 AM In reply to

    Re: My Gelding's Color?

    48northfarm:
    Both my grey girls get cimetidine to maintain they melanoma-free status--Athene--or keep the melanomas from growing, on Juno. 

    48, when I adopted Mac he had fairly significant melanomas under his tail, as well as some in his sheath. His previous owner had him on cimetidine, but it didn't help slow the melanoma growth at all. When I asked my vet if he thought I should continue with it, he told me that it doesn't make much difference. He said that, if the melanomas got much worse, we should do the "anti-melanoma vaccine," which is made from the horse's own blood and costs around $2000-$3000. Then my lameness specialist vet told me that he could simply inject the melanomas and they would eventually slough off -- of course, I took this option, as it was much more economical. I also looked into supplements (I believe Wendall's Herbs has an anti-melanoma supplement, although I never got it because I'm very skeptical about supplements making such claims). Anyways, just wanted to share this info.

    (Sorry to hijack the thread!)

     

  • 03-24-2011 4:13 PM In reply to

    Re: My Gelding's Color?

    Thanks for the info, Frizzle. You're not hijacking the thread b/c RL needs to know this, too, since her gelding will grey out. The cimetedine is keeping the melanomas at bay on Juno--she went on a large dose for awhile, and is on the maintenance dose now, as is Athene--but the vet that put them on the cimetedine never mentioned any other treatment. Did the injections work? What exactly was injected into the melanomas, the cimetedine?
    Megan


    "The horse you get off is not the horse you got on. It is your job as a rider to ensure that as often as possible, the change is for the better."

    Anonymous




  • 03-25-2011 8:13 AM In reply to

    Re: My Gelding's Color?

    I am semi-familiar with melanomas as my friend has a grey horse at her barn with melanomas and I owned this gelding's mom for awhile and we watched her for melanomas as she was middle-aged, but what is cimetedine?  I am not familiar at all with the prevention or treatment of melanomas, just what they look like and the fact that a lot of grays end up with them.  Is cimetedine expensive?  How early should I start prevention, once he turns gray/turns a certain age or right now?

    "99.9% of horse problems come from either a lack of respect or fear--or both." ~Clinton Anderson
  • 03-25-2011 9:39 AM In reply to

    Re: My Gelding's Color?

    Cimetidine is a drug that comes in HUGE tablets. The maintenance dose that I use is one 800mg tablet, crushed into their pelleted feed. Cimetidine is the same as the human heartburn drug Tagamet, but I have no idea how they figured out that the drug worked not only for heartburn but for melanomas. Go figure.

    Cimetidine is pretty cheap: three HUNDRED 800mg tablets are $33 at Wal-Mart in WA. Juno already had melanomas before we started treated hers, with 5 tablets 3 times a day, and now she gets one tab once a day. Athene is only 5, but she gets one tab once a day, too, for prevention. Talk to your vet: he/she may prefer a different time line or treatment.
    Megan


    "The horse you get off is not the horse you got on. It is your job as a rider to ensure that as often as possible, the change is for the better."

    Anonymous




  • 03-25-2011 9:51 AM In reply to

    Re: My Gelding's Color?

    48northfarm:
    Did the injections work? What exactly was injected into the melanomas, the cimetedine?

    Yes, the injections did work, although it was a bit gross. Ick! The melanomas started to ooze black stuff and shrivel up -- it was pretty disgusting! I even got a very early-morning call a few days after the injections because one of the farm caretakers saw Mac lift his tail and thought somewthing was very, very wrong with him!

    I don't remember exactly what was injected into the melanomas, but it wasn't cimetidine (maybe calcium carbonate or something -- ???). And, although it did work, if I had another horse who developed melanomas I would do the anti-tumor vaccine ($$$) treatment. I did a lot of reading on melanomas and discovered that there are often melanomas growing inside the body. Obviously, this can do a lot of damage that you can't even see.

     

  • 03-26-2011 2:28 PM In reply to

    Re: My Gelding's Color?

    Thanks Yes  I will ask my vet about it when he comes out to geld/vaccinate.

    "99.9% of horse problems come from either a lack of respect or fear--or both." ~Clinton Anderson
  • 03-26-2011 4:50 PM In reply to

    Re: My Gelding's Color?

    Gray! Eventually nearly white, when he's old, but he'll always have a few roan hairs, kind of rose gray..

    Cindy Foley, Horse Journal Editor-in-Chief
  • 03-26-2011 4:51 PM In reply to

    Re: My Gelding's Color?

    Gray, sort of a rose gray. Eventually white when he's old. cindy

    Cindy Foley, Horse Journal Editor-in-Chief
  • 03-27-2011 9:39 AM In reply to

    Re: My Gelding's Color?

    The "dorsal" you are seeing is probably counter shading.  Many bays have dorsal stripes also.
  • 03-28-2011 7:01 AM In reply to

    Re: My Gelding's Color?

    Thanks.  I'm not really good with colors, but that would make sense.  Already he's started sheddding out in his face as a really dark grey--almost black.

    "99.9% of horse problems come from either a lack of respect or fear--or both." ~Clinton Anderson

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