Slobber Slobber Slobber...

Last post 08-23-2010 12:36 PM by BoundAwayMercedes. 11 replies.
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  • 08-17-2010 9:43 AM

    Slobber Slobber Slobber...

    I was gone for a weekend (friday - sunday), and went to out to see and ride my horse on Monday. She was slobbering like nothing I've ever seen before. Every minute or so she would lick her lips and at least a half cup to cup of slobber would just drop out, almost as if she was throwing up or something. I know horses can't throw up, but that's what it was most comparable to. She didn't seem to mind or care or even notice, but it was sure weird, and rather gross. 
    She slobbers a lot after I let her graze in clover for awhile, but I had been gone for 3 days, so she wouldn't have been grazing in clover. So I don't know why she's slobbering this much, and I have no clue if I should be concerned or just brush it off as slightly annoying. 
    I rode her, she acted just fine, took the bit fine, didn't act funky at all besides the fact that slobber and spit were constantly dripping from her mouth.
    Any ideas as to what's going on? I would love input....



    "Where in this wide world can man find nobility without pride, friendship without envy, or beauty without vanity? Here, where grace is served with muscle, and strength by gentleness confined, he serves without servility; he has fought without enmity. There is nothing so powerful, nothing less violent. There is nothing so quick, nothing more patient"
  • 08-17-2010 10:29 AM In reply to

    Re: Slobber Slobber Slobber...

    Sounds like she's been getting it somewheres!  Either that or she's gotten into something very similar.  You say she was slobbering like this all the time or when she ate?  Was she stalled the whole time you were gone or did she have any access to grazing at all, to where there could be some clover she got to or something like it you weren't aware of?

    If it were only while she was eating I'd say she needs her teeth looked at, but if it's all the time and there's no way she could have gotten any of that clover, then I'd have to check with the vet. 

     

  • 08-17-2010 10:36 AM In reply to

    Re: Slobber Slobber Slobber...

    She was outside the whole time I was gone, and could have been grazing. I don't think there's clover in her pasture, but I can check again. And she's slobbered before after grazing in clover, but never anywhere near this bad/much...



    "Where in this wide world can man find nobility without pride, friendship without envy, or beauty without vanity? Here, where grace is served with muscle, and strength by gentleness confined, he serves without servility; he has fought without enmity. There is nothing so powerful, nothing less violent. There is nothing so quick, nothing more patient"
  • 08-17-2010 11:25 AM In reply to

    Re: Slobber Slobber Slobber...

    Well, it really sounds like clover slobbers due to a fungus, Rhizoctonia leguminicola, that is found on the clover.  It is usually found on red clover but can be found on any legume (legumes include alfalfa, clover, and trefoil).  It may be present in your hay, as it can still be active for up to 10 months in hay.  The only thing you need to do is remove your horse from the pasture and try to remove legumes from the pasture, especially any clover you find.  The slobbering should subside in 24-72 hours, but there is no need to call the vet unless the horse were to colic, which shouldn't happen if she is kept off the pasture so no need to worry.  Simply mowing your horse's pasture should be enough to destroy the leaves of the legumes, but if this doesn't work you may need to disc or spray your field.

    Another cause could simply be irritation by a plant's stem (some horses slobber because the hairy clover stems irritate their mouths, others get irritated if they accidentally ingest burdocks).  I really doubt this is the cause, though, because she's acting normal otherwise.  Usually the horse will refuse to eat, will slobber food all over the place, will refuse to take the bit or give you problems while you ride, etc. due to mouth pain.  It really sounds like it's clover slobbers (clover slobbers are not uncomfortable for the horse and usually the only clinical sign is slobbering).

     All I would do is just keep her off pasture for a couple of days to see if the slobbering stops.  If it does, you can bet that you've got some sort of legume on your pasture and then you can go from there.

     Hope this helps!  Smile

    "Make the wrong thing difficult and the right thing easy" ~Clinton Anderson
  • 08-17-2010 12:42 PM In reply to

    Re: Slobber Slobber Slobber...

     I agree with what everyone else has said about the clover/legumes.  I have seen horses on clover slobber literally buckets at a time of gooey spit (sometimes really greenIck! and gross) and not seem to care or be affected in any way.  Some of my favorite ponies at summer camp (when I was a kid) used to slobber like this when we would bring them in from the pasture.

    HOTM March 2010
  • 08-18-2010 12:37 PM In reply to

    Re: Slobber Slobber Slobber...

    She's not going to be happy in the stall for a couple days to test the theory, but I'm all for helping her... I think I may just mow the pasture, but leave her out, assume/hope the legumes are in the pasture and will be destroyed with the mowing, keep an eye on her, and only remove her from the pasture if necessary. Do you think that will work/be okay? 
    She doesn't hate stalls, but she's been on pasture all day and night except for feeding for years now, and I really think she won't like staying in the stall all day long, so I'd like to avoid that if I can.
    Also, we have a second horse in that pasture, but I don't ride or get him out regularly (he's my mom's). He doesn't seem to be slobbering, and assuming he actually he isn't, then what do we think the cause is? Because he's in the same pasture, theoretically he would be eating the same stuff... 



    "Where in this wide world can man find nobility without pride, friendship without envy, or beauty without vanity? Here, where grace is served with muscle, and strength by gentleness confined, he serves without servility; he has fought without enmity. There is nothing so powerful, nothing less violent. There is nothing so quick, nothing more patient"
  • 08-18-2010 12:55 PM In reply to

    Re: Slobber Slobber Slobber...

    BoundAwayMercedes:
    I think I may just mow the pasture, but leave her out, assume/hope the legumes are in the pasture and will be destroyed with the mowing, keep an eye on her, and only remove her from the pasture if necessary. Do you think that will work/be okay? 

    I think tha'ts what I'd do.  but I would also call her vet, just to be safe.  if her vet is not available, maybe you could talk to one of the techs, they'd certainly understand!  ask them what they think about your idea or if they think it's something more serious and should not be messed with.  ask them exactly what you asked here.
  • 08-18-2010 9:22 PM In reply to

    Re: Slobber Slobber Slobber...

    Okay I will work on doing just that. My mom thinks its no big deal, isn't concerned at all, I should be trying to convince her we need to at least check it out, correct?



    "Where in this wide world can man find nobility without pride, friendship without envy, or beauty without vanity? Here, where grace is served with muscle, and strength by gentleness confined, he serves without servility; he has fought without enmity. There is nothing so powerful, nothing less violent. There is nothing so quick, nothing more patient"
  • 08-19-2010 10:27 AM In reply to

    Re: Slobber Slobber Slobber...

    This time, Mom does know best. Slobbering from clover is not a big deal. Just messy and gross to look at. Some horses react to it like that, others have no reaction. She is absolutly fine out there. No need to panic. When the clover is gone, the slobbering is gone.


    If you don't want to stand behind our soldiers who are in danger zones, please stand in front of one.

    If you really open your ears and eyes, you will see that there is alot of great advice given on here. You just have to see it and hear it without closing off your mind.


    VanHalen 26 yr QH Stallion R.I.P. 4/11/82 - 5/8/08 24 wonderful years together.
    Scout 25-28 yr Paint/Draft Cross Gelding
    Glistening 13 yr Arab/Saddlebred Mare
  • 08-19-2010 4:14 PM In reply to

    Re: Slobber Slobber Slobber...

    Alright, now I'm confused as to what to do. Let it pass as no biggie, or act? 



    "Where in this wide world can man find nobility without pride, friendship without envy, or beauty without vanity? Here, where grace is served with muscle, and strength by gentleness confined, he serves without servility; he has fought without enmity. There is nothing so powerful, nothing less violent. There is nothing so quick, nothing more patient"
  • 08-23-2010 9:10 AM In reply to

    Re: Slobber Slobber Slobber...

    BoundAwayMercedes:
    Alright, now I'm confused as to what to do. Let it pass as no biggie, or act? 
     

    I think that the advice others gave about mowing down the legumes in the pasture and still turning your horse out is good advice.Yes  If I were in your position with my horse, I would try this and also closely monitor my horse's amount of slobbering, as well as his/her vital signs just to be on the safe side. 

    If the slobbering significantly decreases and/or dissappears, you know that clovers/legumes are the cause.  If the amount of slobbering does not seem to change significantly, I would call the vet.  

    HOTM March 2010
  • 08-23-2010 12:36 PM In reply to

    Re: Slobber Slobber Slobber...

    Okay. Her amount of slobbering is already drastically down. She does it rarely now, and not as much comes out. I can still mow the pasture, but the problem appears to be solving itself.
    Which is awesome. :]



    "Where in this wide world can man find nobility without pride, friendship without envy, or beauty without vanity? Here, where grace is served with muscle, and strength by gentleness confined, he serves without servility; he has fought without enmity. There is nothing so powerful, nothing less violent. There is nothing so quick, nothing more patient"

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