Is this a wobbler syndrome

Last post 02-01-2012 6:52 AM by BoyleHeightsKid. 21 replies.
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  • 12-29-2011 2:33 PM

    Is this a wobbler syndrome

     Hi Everybody,
    We have AQH mare birthed at the begining of April 2011. At the end of November I have spotted that it has problem with a rear legs. And now I am worry that this could be a wobbler syndrome. What do You think? There is no soreness in the area of ​​the spine. As You can seen on the film- it could be easily spotted when it is moving back.During a gallop it pushes the leg out. Our vet don't have idea what it can be. He said that maybe it growing too fast and we should give it more vitamins.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D3_ps1V8avM

    Artur

     

     

  • 12-29-2011 8:31 PM In reply to

    Re: Is this a wobbler syndrome

     It doesn't look like what I've seen of wobblers in the past, but I'm no vet, either, and I've only seen a few cases. 

     If your vet thinks it's from growing too fast, that may be an OCD issue, but vitamins won't help that - that requires x-rays to diagnose and special feeding and exercise in mild cases, or surgery in more severe cases. 

     I'd suggest that you get a second opinion from another vet, or take your horse to a clinic or university that has some imaging equipment to help get a good diagnosis and go from there. 

  • 12-30-2011 9:46 AM In reply to

    Re: Is this a wobbler syndrome

    I, too, suggest a second opinion. If it is a case of excessive growth, I also concur that vitamins will do nothing. The symptoms do not sound like those of OCD. Your best bet is to contact a veterinarian teaching hospital, as was stated, or at least contact a larger clinic. You need another vet to get involved, who can look at your horse first-hand. The members of this forum are not vets, nor do we have first-hand knowledge of your horse. There is a lot of experience here, but it's not from vets. Good luck.
    Megan


    "The horse you get off is not the horse you got on. It is your job as a rider to ensure that as often as possible, the change is for the better."

    Anonymous




  • 01-03-2012 4:38 PM In reply to

    Re: Is this a wobbler syndrome

     Thank you for yours replys. Vet was in the stable. Unfortunatelly he said that he isn't able to make radiological examine of lower back, he can only examine the upper part of spine. He says that in Poland there are no technical conditions to carry out such a study.

  • 01-03-2012 8:19 PM In reply to

    Re: Is this a wobbler syndrome

    Try writing a letter or send an email letter to a vet teaching hospital in the United States. You can find some names of vet schools on-line. Describe your horse's problem and tell them none of the vet equipment needed is available in Poland. I'm sure someone at the teaching hospital will try to help you. Try the Texas A&M University Veterinarian School or University of California, Davis campus, Veterinarian School. Good luck and let us know that you have gotten some help.
    Megan


    "The horse you get off is not the horse you got on. It is your job as a rider to ensure that as often as possible, the change is for the better."

    Anonymous




  • 01-04-2012 5:34 AM In reply to

    Re: Is this a wobbler syndrome

    Is it possible that she may have fallen while playing and maybe injured her pelvis or SI area?  I don't see any swelling in that region, but if she was goofing off and ended up doing the splits with her hind legs she may have strained some muscles and ligaments.  I don't think it's wobblers.  When she's cantering around she swaps leads just fine and doesn't stumble at all.  Other than her hind legs looking very stiff and not wanting to bring them up under her she looks fine.

    The way she swings her legs out to the side could also indicate sore stifles.  Sometimes when babies are growing their bones grow faster and the muscles and ligaments have to catch up.  I can't remember the name of the condition but sometimes you have to watch how much protein they get.  What are you feeding her?  Many times with that condition once you adjust the diet, after time the condition subsides.

    If you don't mind I would like to cross post this video on COTH (chronicle of the horse).  There are a ton of knowledgeable people over there and most likely have seen this before.

    She's a very nice looking baby by the way...

    A good rider rides transition to transition, a great rider rides half-halt to half-halt!

    ~Robert Dover
  • 01-05-2012 12:39 PM In reply to

    Re: Is this a wobbler syndrome

     Onece again thank you for all yours posts. Unfortunately I don't know if she had fall of- she spent all the time out side with other horses. We feed her crushed oats but we also give her extra vitamins. Of course you can cross post my video on COTH, I will be very gratefull.

     

  • 01-05-2012 1:30 PM In reply to

    Re: Is this a wobbler syndrome

    Cross posted!  You can see the thread here:

    http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/showthread.php?t=336524

    A good rider rides transition to transition, a great rider rides half-halt to half-halt!

    ~Robert Dover
  • 01-05-2012 7:28 PM In reply to

    Re: Kevin Kolb is still dealing with concussion symptoms

    SPAM removed.  This is a horse forum, not a football forum.
  • 01-09-2012 5:48 PM In reply to

    Re: Is this a wobbler syndrome

     BoyleHeightsKid, thank you for posting my video on COTH forum- past are very interesting. As users suggests - I made another video on which I tried to make classical neuro test. Could you also cross post it? I also forget to add that our  filly caught in the previous stables a soft hooves arrows ( I am not sure how it is called in english) in the previous film was still in treatment.  

     http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vx_BP_VK3EI

     

    Thank You,

    Artur

  • 01-10-2012 5:13 AM In reply to

    Re: Is this a wobbler syndrome

    I cross posted the other video.  One of the members' father is a vet and one of his vet techs is Polish and fluent in your language.  I can try to get you in touch with them if you're interested.

    A good rider rides transition to transition, a great rider rides half-halt to half-halt!

    ~Robert Dover
  • 01-10-2012 9:49 AM In reply to

    Re: Is this a wobbler syndrome

    Wow. You've covered everything, BHK. That is certain to get Artur some help for his filly. Good job. Aren't forum connections great?
    Megan


    "The horse you get off is not the horse you got on. It is your job as a rider to ensure that as often as possible, the change is for the better."

    Anonymous




  • 01-10-2012 10:39 AM In reply to

    Re: Is this a wobbler syndrome

    The thing I love about COTH is it's so huge.  I started that thread less than a week ago and it's had almost 1900 hits.  That's great especially when you have a stumper case like this filly.

    It's unfortunate that he doesn't have the resources over there to get her some help.  After watching the second video I'm convinced her problem is neurological.  When he picks up her feet she's not sure where to put them back down and when he pulls on her tail she doesn't seem to pull back and hump up her back.

    OP I hope you can receive some help for this filly.  Please let me know if you would like to try to get in touch with the people I mentioned above.

    A good rider rides transition to transition, a great rider rides half-halt to half-halt!

    ~Robert Dover
  • 01-10-2012 2:23 PM In reply to

    Re: Is this a wobbler syndrome

    I've analyzed all the yours answers and I will arrange this week spine and stiffle x-rays.
    I'll check the mare for the mechanical injuries ( neuro vs OCD). I will describe the results.

    Thank you all for your help.

    BoyleHeightsKid could you contact me with JackieBlue husband father - veterinarian?

    P.S. We do not have opossus in Poland. Does EPM is also transmitted in other ways?

  • 01-11-2012 4:36 AM In reply to

    Re: Is this a wobbler syndrome

    EPM is caused by the parasite Sarcocystis neurona.  If you have any animals over there that would carry that parasite in there *** that's how it would be transmitted.  Many horses here in the US have been exposed to it.  Either the horse gets it or they don't.  My vet doesn't even recommend giving the vaccine saying it's useless.

    I'll get back with you on that contact information!

    I can't wait to hear what the x-rays tell us!  I'm sending jingles that there is a way to help her.  She's such a sweetie!

    A good rider rides transition to transition, a great rider rides half-halt to half-halt!

    ~Robert Dover

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